The Comox Valley Water Treatment Project

The Comox Valley Water Treatment Project

Bob Wells sits on the board that makes decisions about the Comox Valley’s water supply.  He has been making sure that tax payers’ money is being spent wisely to ensure safe drinking water.  The installation of the UV treatment station will see an immediate reduction in boil water advisories by about 80%.  Residents will no longer be inconvenienced and restaurants and businesses will not have the added frustrations and expenses. UV treatment is part of the final solution and the CVRD has purchased the reactors in advance and has installed them on the existing system.  Once the major filtration treatment project is underway the UV reactors will be installed in the final water treatment plant. The large scale project will not be completed until 2021. Watch the video below for more...
MUNICIPAL ELECTION 2018: WHO’S IN, WHO’S OUT (DecafNation)

MUNICIPAL ELECTION 2018: WHO’S IN, WHO’S OUT (DecafNation)

PHOTO: Courtenay Councilor David Frisch will seek a second term to finish work on transportation, zoning and the city’s downtown core An article well worth reading, from the Comox Valley’s new source for community journalism, Decaf Nation. With just 257 days before Comox Valley voters choose the 29 elected officials who will run local governments and school district through 2022, only a few people have declared their candidacy. That’s not unusual for this community, where candidates historically wait until summer to announce they are running. But it’s not the norm in other communities. In the Capital Regional District, for example, most of the 13 incumbent mayors have announced their plans to stand for re-election.In a Decafnation survey of the Valley’s three municipalities, only four incumbents say they definitely plan to seek office again: Courtenay’s Erik Eriksson and David Frisch, Comox Valley Regional District Area B Director Rod Nicol and School District 71 Board Chair Janice Caton. Read more on Decaf...
Courtenay city council approves 12 new positions

Courtenay city council approves 12 new positions

In a 5-2 vote Monday, Courtenay council approved 12 new city staff positions that will be a $1 million-plus expense by next year. The rationale for the staffing bump concerns a 43 per cent growth in Courtenay’s population from 2001-2016. Staff growth during the same period was 27 per cent. The discrepancy impedes the aim of sustainable service delivery — identified as a council priority. “This is no surprise to me,” said Coun. David Frisch, who feels City Hall is under-staffed. “I recognize our staff work really hard here.” Couns. Doug Hillian, Erik Eriksson, Bob Wells and Rebecca Lennox also approved the additional positions. Mayor Larry Jangula and Coun. Manno Theos were opposed. Scott Stanfield Staff Writer, Comox Valley Record Read the full article on the Comox Valley...
Comox councillor blasts Cumberland over water meeting invite

Comox councillor blasts Cumberland over water meeting invite

Comox council will send a letter in opposition to the Village of Cumberland’s inclusion in a meeting with the province on turbidity issues at Perseverance Creek and the regional water system. The letter will urge the Comox Valley Regional District to follow its own water committee motion, which passed unanimously on Jan. 24. That motion called for a meeting between provincial officials and representatives from Comox and the City of Courtenay, where the vast majority of the region’s water system users live. It specifically did not mention inviting a representative of Cumberland to attend. Read the original article at the Comox Valley Echo However, CVRD chair Bruce Jolliffe penned a separate invitation to Cumberland council on Feb. 15 for village Mayor Leslie Baird to join the delegation. The letter was also signed by Courtenay city councillor Bob Wells, who chairs the water committee. That stoked the ire of Comox councillor and water committee vice-chair Ken Grant , who voiced opposition when a copy of Jolliffe’s letter came up during a Comox committee of the whole meeting. Grant suggested inviting Cumberland to a sit-down with the B.C. ministers for Health and Forests, Lands and natural Resource Operations would “weaken” the position of the delegation. Grant said he was “exceedingly clear that I didn’t think that that was a very good idea” for Cumberland to be included during discussion at the water committee meeting, because Cumberland was “party to the problem.” “I think we’ve been put in a really awkward and bad spot here …” Grant told fellow council members. “My opinion is Cumberland isn’t really taking this overly seriously, they’ve...
Jolliffe re-elected as CVRD chair

Jolliffe re-elected as CVRD chair

Read the original article on the Comox Valley Regional District's website. Comox Valley posted Dec 14, 2016 at 12:00 PM - Scott Stanfield, Record staff. Comox Valley Regional District directors have re-elected Bruce Jolliffe as chair of the board and Bob Wells as vice-chair. Jolliffe is the director for Area A (Baynes Sound - Denman/Hornby Islands) and Wells is a Courtenay director. Both were acclaimed to the positions. “I’m honoured to accept the role of chair again,” said Jolliffe, who enters his  third term as board chair. “I feel our board is working very well. We do have quite vigorous debate, and I am hoping that you (directors) feel that in two years of chairing, you’ve been given the opportunity to get your views across.” Having reached the mid-point of its mandate, Jolliffe said the board has pulled together a number of strategic initiatives. He also noted emerging issues such as water, sewer and flood mitigation. The district is also in the process of finding a replacement for CAO Deb Oakman. Jolliffe hopes to continue building on the working relationships established with local leaders. “I think we’ve made a really good start. I see our board continue to deliver results. We’re getting there.” Read the original article on the Comox Valley Record's...
Courtenay council embroiled in ‘texting’ controversy

Courtenay council embroiled in ‘texting’ controversy

It’s not a scandal on the scale of Anthony Weiner “sexting” photos of himself. But the issue of “texting” has raised a bit of a scuffle at Courtenay council: Should elected officials be sending, or receiving and reading, texts from their cell phones while sitting at the council table? Courtenay Mayor Larry Jangula thinks not. Read the original article on the Comox Valley Echo. But many of his councillors think that, hey, this is the digital age. Why not? The matter arose after at least one letter to city hall was received accusing a member of the audience of texting messages to members of council during a heated debate Nov. 7 on the tree protection bylaw. “At that meeting a number of the attendees were shocked to observe what we believe were texting communications being exchanged between a member of the audience and one or two of the councillors. The activity took place during the meeting … but after open dialogue between the floor and council had been closed,” said the letter writer. The writer’s identity was blocked out on the letter because he or she did not give permission to have it made public on the city’s official records or website. This writer also noted that the incident was reported to the Governance and Structure Department of the Ministry in Victoria, as well as the Office of the B.C. Ombudsperson. The B.C. Ombudsperson apparently referred the matter back to the City to handle. The Comox Valley Echo also received a letter about the texting from a person who included their name. Irene Murray, of Courtenay, accused a former...
Water commission votes to proceed on deep water intake plans

Water commission votes to proceed on deep water intake plans

In a 7-5 weighted vote, the Comox Valley water committee decided Tuesday to proceed with details for a deep water intake at Comox Lake, and direct filtration treatment, as recommended by Opus DaytonKnight Consultants. The details include property acquisition, permits and approvals, design, and grant funding applications. The project is estimated to cost about $105 million. View the original article by Scott Stanfield at the Comox Valley Record Courtenay director/committee chair Bob Wells, Comox directors Ken Grant and Barbara Price, Area B director Rod Nichol and Area A director Bruce Jolliffe favoured the recommendation. Opposed were Courtenay directors Manno Theos and Erik Eriksson, and Area C director Edwin Grieve. The regional district commissioned a study in response to Island Health’s requirement to provide filtration to comply with the Drinking Water Protection Act. Elevated turbidity events in 2014 and 2015 prompted the CVRD to issue boil water notices under Island Health’s direction. The district had obtained a filtration deferral, but the water advisories prompted Island Health to revoke the filtration deferral process. The CVRD must now include filtration in its water treatment. “There is absolutely no underlying science for what we are about to undertake for the plus-$100 million project,” Grieve said. He suggests Island Health has picked the lowest common denominator (one NTU) to boil water while other B.C. jurisdictions are allowed two or three times that amount before water advisories are issued. “That’s a huge impact on our community, on our businesses.” Though he realizes “resistance is futile,” Grieve feels the CVRD is being forced to mitigate more against lawsuits than...
Family Fun at the 2016 YANA Ride

Family Fun at the 2016 YANA Ride

Great day at the ‪#‎YANAComoxValley‬ family bike ride. Over 600 people were out today and over 150 volunteers worked to help make the Simon’s Cycle fundraiser a success!!! It was great to have Michelle and our 3 kids, Megan, Connor, and Quinn complete the ride with us!! Have a look at the gallery below for some pics of our family at the...
Sunrise Rotary Presentation on Startup Canada

Sunrise Rotary Presentation on Startup Canada

I was honoured to speak at the Strahcona Sunrise Rotary meeting recently (20 August 2016) on how Start Up Canada spread across Canada and how Start Up Comox Valley can help local entrepreneurs. I also tried to bring some focus to how “rabbits” (small businesses) are more important than unicorns, if you know what I mean. If you don’t, ask me in person the next time you see me. I’d be happy to tell you more...

Pin It on Pinterest